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California ISO, PacifiCorp launch first western energy market

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Electric Transmission & Distribution

America relies on an aging electrical grid and pipeline distribution systems, some of which originated in the 1880s. Investment in power transmission has increased since 2005, but ongoing permitting issues, weather events, and limited maintenance have contributed to an increasing number of failures and power interruptions. While demand for electricity has remained level, the availability of energy in the form of electricity, natural gas, and oil will become a greater challenge after 2020 as the population increases. Although about 17,000 miles of additional high-voltage transmission lines are planned over the next five years, permitting and siting issues threaten their completion.

Natural Gas Pipelines

The U.S. natural gas pipeline network is a highly integrated transmission and distribution grid that can transport natural gas to and from nearly any location in the lower 48 States. The natural gas pipeline grid comprises more than 210 natural gas pipeline systems, over 305,000 miles of interstate and intrastate transmission pipelines, more than 1,400 compressor stations that maintain pressure on the natural gas pipeline network and assure continuous forward movement of supplies

Oil & Liquid Fuels Pipelines

More than 180,000 miles of liquid petroleum pipelines traverse the United States. They connect producing areas to refineries and chemical plants while delivering the products American consumers and businesses need.  Pipelines are safe, efficient and, because most are buried, largely unseen. They move crude oil from oil fields on land and offshore to refineries where it is turned into fuels and other products, then from the refineries to terminals where fuels are trucked to retail outlets. Pipelines operate 24 hours a day, seven days a week.

Vehicle Fueling & Charging Facilities

Energy density and the cost, weight, and size of onboard energy storage are important characteristics of fuels for transportation.  Fuels that require large, heavy, or expensive storage can reduce the space available to convey people and freight, weigh down a vehicle (making it operate less efficiently), or make it too costly to operate, even after taking account of cheaper fuels.  Compared to gasoline and diesel, other options may have more energy per unit weight, but none have more energy per unit volume, and so these liquid fuels continue to fuel the vast majority of vehicles in Utah and nationwide.  More than a dozen alternative fuels are in production or under development for use in alternative fuel vehicles and advanced technology vehicles. Government and private-sector vehicle fleets are the primary users of these fuels and vehicles, but consumers are increasingly interested in them.  Using alternative fuels and advanced vehicles instead of conventional fuels and vehicles helps the United States reduce petroleum use and vehicle emissions.

 

Related Posts

California ISO, PacifiCorp launch first western energy market

The California Independent System Operator Corporation (ISO) and Portland-based PacifiCorp announced today that the Energy Imbalance Market (EIM) went live on November 1. The real-time market is the first of its kind in the West. “Consumers across the West win one today as the Energy Imbalance Market is live, performing well and working to reduce costs to consumers,” said Steve Berberich, ISO President and CEO. “When combined with EIM’s inherent…

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Not much longer to go for old Carbon power plant

Patsy Stoddard – Sun Advocate The Carbon Plant just celebrated its 60th anniversary but probably won’t see another. This plant has not been brought into environmental compliance and will be decommissioned in 2015, according to Rocky Mountain Power President Richard Walje. Walje was in Price last week to brief the community and its leaders on the company’s situation in Castle Country. He said said they tried but were unable to…

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State releases status quo plan for two old, coal-fired power plants

Brian Maffly – The Salt Lake Tribune Utah environmental regulators on Wednesday unveiled a revised plan for clearing the skies over the state’s national parks, but to environmentalists’ dismay it would do nothing to further cut emissions from aging coal-fired power plants. Environmental groups and national park advocates had hoped the plan would require Rocky Mountain Power to retrofit two of its biggest Utah plants with the best technology available…

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Tesoro exploring alternative route

David Burger – The Park Record Tesoro Refining & Marketing, bowing to feedback from Summit County officials and stakeholders such as water purveyors and landowners, is exploring the possibility of altering the route of the proposed Uinta Express Pipeline considerably. Michael Gebhardt, vice president of strategy and business development for Tesoro, said Thursday in a phone interview with The Park Record that the oil company is investigating an alternate route…

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New line powers growth, dependability and public safety in Beaver County

Amy Joi O’Donoghue – Deseret News The head of the Utah Bureau of Land Management and the president of Rocky Mountain Power took part in a celebratory signing ceremony Monday marking construction of a critical energy transmission line. The event featuring Juan Palma and Richard Walje at the Milford City Offices marks start of a project to put in the new Cameron to Milford 138,000-volt line to shore up vulnerabilities in the…

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Proposed collector of natural gas lines in Moab area up for public review

Amy Joi O’Donoghue – The Deseret News A proposed 25-mile network of gathering lines to carry the captured natural gas from existing or new oil wells is up for public review in what promises to be another controversy between environmentalists and industry. Tension has continued to dominate the interplay among Grand County officials, Fidelity Exploration and Production Co., and environmental groups over the uptick in industry activity on lands adjacent…

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Basin railroad plans marching along

Kevin Ashby – Vernal Express “If we are going to fund schools fully in Utah then the money will come from energy development,” said Senator Van Tassell to chamber representatives from across the state. Van Tassell explained to the group that there were 26 different routes that were considered in the effort to identify railroad routes that could be used to transport energy products from the Basin. These routes included…

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Rail Line Would Deliver Uinta Basin Energy to Markets

Judy Fahys – KUER Plans are moving forward to build a 100-mile rail line from Duchesne, through the wild Uinta Basin, and into Price. KUER’s Judy Fahys reports on the ambitious and expensive proposal to move Utah energy products into the market. The Uinta Basin rail project is a big idea. And its price tag is big, too – as much as $4 billion. But state transportation officials estimate an even bigger…

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More plans for mining on Tavaputs

C.J. McManus – Sun Advocate An undisclosed mining company with interests in Utah held a meeting with several members of the East Carbon City Council, Carbon County Commission and Utah Department of Air and Water Quality on June 18 to discuss the permitting and construction of an underground mining facility near the Tavaputs Plateau. According to East Carbon City Council member David Avery, the company plans to construct an operation…

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Wells to rails: Utah may build $2 billion line to ship oil

Lee Davidson – The Salt Lake Tribune After studying 26 possible routes for a rail line to transport crude oil from the Uinta Basin, the Utah Department of Transportation revealed Friday that only one is feasible. That is a 100-mile route southwest to Price, roughly along U.S. 191, which would require a 10-mile tunnel through mountains. It could connect with national rail lines near Price, and take oil to Wasatch…

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